Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Reclams Rote Reihe - Fremdsprachentexte. Sprache: Englisch.
eBook epub

Dieses eBook können Sie auf allen Geräten lesen, die epub-fähig sind. z.B. auf den tolino oder Sony Readern.

Häufig gestellte Fragen zu epub eBooks und DRM

Eines der populärsten (Kinder-) Bücher der englischen Literatur - mit den kongenialen Illustrationen von John Tenniel, die ein integraler Bestandteil des Buches sind.

Ungekürzte und unbearbeitete Textausgabe in der Originalsprache, mit Übersetzungen … weiterlesen
eBook epub

4,49 *

inkl. MwSt.
Sofort lieferbar (Download)
Machen Sie jemandem eine Freude und
verschenken Sie einen Download!
Ganz einfach Downloads verschenken - so funktioniert's:
  1. 1 Geben Sie die Adresse der Person ein, die Sie beschenken
    möchten. Mit einer lieben Grußbotschaft verleihen Sie Ihrem
    Geschenk eine persönliche Note.
  2. 2 Bezahlen Sie das Geschenk bequem per Kreditkarte,
    Überweisung oder Lastschrift.
  3. 3 Der/die Geschenkempfänger/in bekommt von uns Ihre Nachricht
    und eine Anleitung zum Downloaden Ihres Geschenks!
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland als eBook epub

Produktdetails

Titel: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Autor/en: Lewis Carroll

EAN: 9783159604848
Format:  EPUB
Reclams Rote Reihe - Fremdsprachentexte.
Sprache: Englisch.
Illustriert von John Tenniel
Herausgegeben von Dietrich Klose
Reclam Philipp Jun.

5. Februar 2014 - epub eBook - 165 Seiten

Beschreibung

Eines der populärsten (Kinder-) Bücher der englischen Literatur - mit den kongenialen Illustrationen von John Tenniel, die ein integraler Bestandteil des Buches sind.

Ungekürzte und unbearbeitete Textausgabe in der Originalsprache, mit Übersetzungen schwieriger Wörter, Nachwort und Literaturhinweisen. Mit Seitenzählung der gedruckten Ausgabe: Buch und E-Book können parallel benutzt werden.

Leseprobe

[9] Chapter I
Down the
Rabbit-Hole


Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, “and what is the use of a book,” thought Alice, “without pictures or conversations?”

So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and [10] stupid), whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, “Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!” (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoatpocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbithole under the hedge.

In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself [11] before she found herself falling do
wn a very deep well.

Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her, and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything; then she looked at the sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and book-shelves: here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed; it was labelledORANGE MARMALADE”, but to her great disappointment it was empty: she did not like to drop the jar for fear of killing somebody underneath, so managed to put it into one of the cupboards as she fell past it.1

“Well!” thought Alice to herself, “after such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling down stairs! How brave they’ll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn’t say anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house!” (Which was very likely true.)

Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an end! “I wonder how many miles I’ve fallen by this time?” she said aloud. “I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth. Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think –” (for, you see, [12] Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a very good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over) “– yes, that’s about the right distance – but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I’ve got to?” (Alice had no idea what Latitude was, or Longitude either, but thought they were nice grand words to sa
y.)

Presently she began again. “I wonder if I shall fall right through the earth! How funny it’ll seem to come out among the people that walk with their heads downwards! The Antipathies, I think –” (she was rather glad there was no one listening, this time, as it didn’t sound at all the right word) “– but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country is, you know. Please, Ma’am, is this New Zealand or Australia?” (and she tried to curtsey as she spoke – fancy curtseying as you’re falling through the air! Do you think you could manage it!) “And what an ignorant little girl she’ll think me for asking! No, it’ll never do to ask: perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere.”

Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. “Dinah’ll miss me very much to-night, I should think!” (Dinah was the cat.) “I hope they’ll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. [13] Dinah, my dear! I wish you were down here with me! There are no mice in the air, I’m afraid, but you might catch a bat, and that’s very like a mouse, you know. But do cats eat bats, I wonder?” And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, “Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?” and sometimes, “Do bats eat cats?” for, you see, as she couldn’t answer either question, it didn’t much matter which way she put it. She felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and saying to her very earnestly, “Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat?” when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall was over.

Alice w
as not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet in a moment: she looked up, but it was all dark overhead; before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a moment to be lost: away went Alice like the wind, and was just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, “Oh my ears and whiskers, how late it’s getting!” She was close behind it when she turned the corner, but the Rabbit was no longer to be seen: she found herself in a long, low hall, which was lit up by a row of lamps hanging from the roof.

There were doors all round the hall, but they were all locked; and when Alice had been all the way down one [14] side and up the other, trying every door, she walked sadly down the middle, wondering how she was ever to get out again.

Suddenly she came upon a little three-legged table, all made of solid glass; there was nothing on it except a tiny golden key, and Alice’s first thought was that it might belong to one of the doors of the hall; but, alas! either the locks were too large, or the key was too small, but at any rate it would not open any of them. However, on the second time round, she came upon a low curtain she had not noticed before, and behind it was a little door about fifteen inches high: she tried the little golden key in the lock, and to her great delight it fitted!

Alice opened the door and found that it led into a small passage, not much larger than a rat-hole: she [15] knelt down and looked along the passage into the loveliest garden you ever saw. How she longed to get out of that dark hall, and wander about among those beds of bright flowers and those cool fountains, but she could not even get her head through the doorway; “and even if my head would go through,” thought poor Alice, “it would be of very little use without my shoulders. Oh, how I wish I could shut up like
a telescope! I think I could, if I only knew how to begin.” For, you see, so many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible.

There seemed to be no use in waiting by the little door, so she went back to the table, half hoping she might find another key on it, or at any rate a book of rules for shutting people up like telescopes: this time she found a little bottle on it (“which certainly was not here before,” said Alice), and round the neck of the bottle was a paper label, with the words “DRINK ME” beautifully printed on it in large letters.

It was all very well to say “Drink me,” but the wise little Alice was not going to do that in a hurry. “No, I’ll look first,” she said, “and see whether it’s marked ‘poison’ or not”; for she had read several nice little histories about children who had got burnt, and eaten up by wild beasts and other unpleasant things, all because they would not remember the simple rules their friends had taught them: such as, that a red-hot poker will burn you if you [16] hold it too long; and that if you cut your finger very deeply with a knife, it usually bleeds; and she had never forgotten that, if you drink much from a bottle marked “poison,” it is almost certain to disagree with you, sooner or later.

However, this bottle was not marked “poison,” so Alice ventured to taste it, and finding it very nice (it had, in fact, a sort of mixed flavour of cherry-tart, custard, pine-apple, roast turkey, toffee, and hot buttered toast), she very soon...


Technik

Dieses eBook wird im epub-Format geliefert und ist mit einem Wasserzeichen versehen. Sie können dieses eBook auf vielen gängigen Endgeräten lesen.

Sie können dieses eBook auf vielen gängigen Endgeräten lesen.

Für welche Geräte?
Sie können das eBook auf allen Lesegeräten, in Apps und in Lesesoftware öffnen, die epub unterstützen:

  • tolino Reader
    Öffnen Sie das eBook nach der automatischen Synchronisation auf dem Reader oder übertragen Sie es manuell auf Ihr tolino Gerät mit der kostenlosen Software Adobe Digital Editions.

  • Andere eBook Reader
    Laden Sie das eBook direkt auf dem Reader im Hugendubel.de-Shop herunter oder übertragen Sie es mit der kostenlosen Software Sony READER FOR PC/Mac oder Adobe Digital Editions.

  • Für Tablets und Smartphones: Unsere Gratis tolino Lese-App
         

  • PC und Mac
    Lesen Sie das eBook direkt nach dem Herunterladen über "Jetzt lesen" im Browser, oder mit der kostenlosen Lesesoftware Adobe Digital Editions.

Die eBook-Datei wird beim Herunterladen mit einem nicht löschbaren Wasserzeichen individuell markiert, sodass die Ermittlung und rechtliche Verfolgung des ursprünglichen Käufers im Fall einer missbräuchlichen Nutzung der eBook-Datei möglich ist.

Bitte beachten Sie: Dieses eBook ist nicht auf Kindle-Geräten lesbar.

Ihr erstes eBook?
Hier erhalten Sie alle Informationen rund um die digitalen Bücher für Neueinsteiger.

Mehr aus dieser Reihe

zurück
False Friends: A Short Dictionary
eBook epub
von Margaret Nester,…
Grammatisches Lernlexikon Englisch
eBook epub
von Andrew Williams
Othello
eBook epub
von William Shakespe…
Discussing in English. Englisch-deutsche Diskussionswendungen mit Anwendungsbeispielen
eBook epub
von Heinz-Otto Hohma…
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
eBook epub
von L. Frank Baum
vor
Servicehotline
089 - 70 80 99 47

Mo. - Fr. 8.00 - 20.00 Uhr
Sa. 10.00 - 20.00 Uhr
Filialhotline
089 - 30 75 75 75

Mo. - Sa. 9.00 - 20.00 Uhr
Bleiben Sie in Kontakt:
Sicher & bequem bezahlen:
akzeptierte Zahlungsarten: Überweisung, offene Rechnung,
Visa, Master Card, American Express, Paypal
Zustellung durch:
1 Mängelexemplare sind Bücher mit leichten Beschädigungen, die das Lesen aber nicht einschränken. Mängelexemplare sind durch einen Stempel als solche gekennzeichnet. Die frühere Buchpreisbindung ist aufgehoben. Angaben zu Preissenkungen beziehen sich auf den gebundenen Preis eines mangelfreien Exemplars.

2 Diese Artikel unterliegen nicht der Preisbindung, die Preisbindung dieser Artikel wurde aufgehoben oder der Preis wurde vom Verlag gesenkt. Die jeweils zutreffende Alternative wird Ihnen auf der Artikelseite dargestellt. Angaben zu Preissenkungen beziehen sich auf den vorherigen Preis.

4 Der gebundene Preis dieses Artikels wird nach Ablauf des auf der Artikelseite dargestellten Datums vom Verlag angehoben.

5 Der Preisvergleich bezieht sich auf die unverbindliche Preisempfehlung (UVP) des Herstellers.

6 Der gebundene Preis dieses Artikels wurde vom Verlag gesenkt. Angaben zu Preissenkungen beziehen sich auf den vorherigen Preis.

7 Die Preisbindung dieses Artikels wurde aufgehoben. Angaben zu Preissenkungen beziehen sich auf den vorherigen Preis.

* Alle Preise verstehen sich inkl. der gesetzlichen MwSt. Informationen über den Versand und anfallende Versandkosten finden Sie hier.